EL E 337
Digital Systems Laboratory II

Textbook: Practical Digital Electronics: Laboratory Workbook by M. Bird and R. Schmidt, 1974

References: Digital Design Fundamentals by K.J. Breeding, Prentice Hall, Inc. 1989.

Coordinator: Dr. Charles E. Smith, Chair and Professor of Electrical Engineering

Goals: The experiments outlined for this laboratory offer the student the opportunity of a "hands-on" experience with state-of-the-art technology in the areas of digital systems (MSI and LSI). In addition, the student implements theoretical concepts, presented in the lecture course, ELE 335 - Principles of Digital Systems, in a practical applications environment. The self-paced format has been extremely successful primarily for the individual student. This format has also proved to be an effective way for the student to gain maturity in field of digital systems while developing individual initiative in the application of engineering principles.

Prerequisites by Topic: Basic Digital Systems Theory (ELE 335, 336)

Topics

  1. Operation
  2. Logic Probe, Pulser, and Clip
  3. De Morgan's Theorem
  4. Exclusive OR gate
  5. RS Latch
  6. D Latch and Flip-Flop
  7. JK Flip-Flop
  8. Shift-Registers
  9. Asynchronous Counters
  10. Synchronous Counters
  11. Application of Digital Counters
  12. Decoders and Encoders
  13. Multiplexers and Demultiplexers, parity generating, and checking
  14. Adders
  15. Subtractors
  16. 4-BIT A.L.U.
  17. Multiplication
  18. ROM
  19. RAM
  20. Monostable Multivibrators Schmitt Triggers

Summary

Application of modern digital integrated circuits: Individual Logic Gates, Binary Memory Elements, Sequential Logic Circuits, Data Handling Circuits, Arithmetic Elements, Memories, and Signal Conditioning Devices. (self-Paced Laboratory)

The required laboratory courses related to the undergraduate curriculum in the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Mississippi were developed in the mid-sixties with the then existing equipment to provide a meaningful laboratory experience for the student. At present, even with the equipment obtained from grants through the efforts of the faculty, the undergraduate laboratories in basic circuits, electronics, and systems remain essentially as they were in the sixties, particularly in the area of systems theory. On the other hand, electrical technology has not remained at the mid-sixties plateau, but has progressed tremendously. The last forty years have seen the full maturity of the technology on integrated circuits (IC) in the form of medium scale (MSI) circuits and the birth and growth of the large-scale of integrated (LSI) circuits technology. This technology has given society the IC operational amplifier (op-amp) for linear system design and the LSI microprocessor for digital system and computer design. This same LSI technology has fostered the unprecedented growth of the electronic calculator and micro-minicomputer industry in this country. These applications are only the beginning of the total impact of the MSI and LSI technologies on the electrical engineering community for already microprocessors and op-amps are being used in computer control application in automobiles, washing machines, television, etc. These advanced have thus begun a revolution in system design because in the very near future electrical design will be based almost entirely on the IC op-amp and the LSI microprocessor.

Because of these changes, it is necessary that our curriculum reflect current technology in integrated circuits, particularly in the digital systems area. Over the past thirty years, this proposed, self-paced, laboratory has been taught as a special projects course. Enrollment has steadily increased as a result of students interest, and the impact of this course has been evidenced in the increased effective use of IC circuits in both senior design courses. The experiments outlined for this laboratory offer the student the opportunity of a "hands-on" experience with state-of-the-art technology in the areas of digital systems (MSI and LSI). In addition, the student implements theoretical concepts, presented in the lecture course, ELE 335 - Principles of Digital Systems, in a practical applications environment. The self-paced format has been extremely successful primarily because of flexibility in the laboratory scheduling for the individual student. This format has also provided to be an effective way for the student to gain maturity in field of digital system while developing individual initiative in the application of engineering principles.

Course Outline: Required Experiments from Practical Digital Electronics by M. Bird and R. Schmidt

  1. Logic Lab Familiarization--Introduction to the Logic Lab and Diagnostic Tools.
    • Exp. 1 - Operation
    • Exp. 2 - Logic Probe, Pulser, and Clip
  2. Individual Logic Gates--Review concepts previously presented in ELE 336 while introducing the 74XX Family of IC's.
    • Exp. 8 - De Mograns's Theorem
    • Exp. 9 - Exclusive OR Gate
  3. Binary Memory Elements--Present different types of Binary information storage devices.
    • Exp. 10 - RS Latch
    • Exp. 11 - D Latch and Flip-Flop
    • Exp. 12 - JK Flip-Flop
  4. Sequential Logic--Investigate the combination of individual logic gates along with memory elements to form the most general type of digital system
    • Exp. 13 - Shift-Registers
    • Exp. 14 - Asynchronous Counters
    • Exp. 15 - Synchronous Counters
    • Exp. 16 - Application of Digital Counters
  5. Data Handling Circuits--Examine circuits which alter data form and detect illegal data patterns.
    • Exp. 17 - Decoders and Encoders
    • Exp. 18 - Multiplexers and Demultiplexers parity generating and Checking
  6. Arithmetic Elements--Construct logic circuits capable of performing arithmetic operations.
    • Exp. 19 - Adders
    • Exp. 20 - Subtractors
    • Exp. 21 - 4 BIT A.L.U.
    • Exp. 22 - Multiplication
  7. Memories--Study the characteristics and design of Read Only (ROM) and Random Access(RAM) memory systems.
    • Exp. 23 - ROM
    • Exp. 24 - RAM
  8. Signal Conditioning Devices--Examine devices capable of modifying the duration of an enhancing the shape of digital signals.
    • Exp. 25 - Monostable Multivibrators Schmitt Triggers.